Where to See the Monarch Butterfly Migration in Asheville

Monarch - Hop 'n Blueberry Farm

Shortly before fall in Asheville and the Great Smoky Mountains, thousands of Monarch butterflies pass through the Asheville area as they migrate south to Mexico. The butterflies travel more than 2,000 miles on their journey, and we're fortunate that Western North Carolina is right along their route! 

When to see Monarch butterflies in Asheville, NC

Monarch ButterflyFrom the middle of September and continuing for several weeks into October, the monarchs make their way through the Great Smoky Mountains along the high-elevation mountain ridges.

Fall color generally begins in the highest elevations in early October. See our guide to fall in the mountains for more ways to experience this magical time in Asheville.

Where to see Monarch butterflies in Asheville

Locations along the Blue Ridge Parkway, especially the Mount Pisgah area and the Black Balsam areas, are great places to spot these beautiful butterflies. The butterflies can often be seen among the flowers and foliage.

Top locations include:

  • Wagon Gap Road parking area (Milepost 412.2)
  • Pounding Mill Overlook (Milepost 413.2)
  • Cherry Cove Overlook (Milepost 415.7)
  • Black Balsam summit (Milepost 420.2)

There is a pull off at each of these locations with parking. To reach the Black Balsam summit, you will need to do a short hike on the Art Loeb Trail. See our guide to Black Balsam for more details.

The Orchard at Altapass on the Blue Ridge Parkway (328.3) is another great place to see the butterflies. The Orchard is committed to preserving natural milkweed, the larval host plant for Monarchs. You'll even find a butterfly garden just steps from the Orchard shop! Each year, the Orchard also raises Monarchs in terraniums in the Orchard shop from egg to larva to chrysalis to butterfly to help support the butterfly population. Six of their tagged butterflies have been found in Mexico! 

Monarch butterfly Events in Asheville

Nearly one billion monarch butterflies have vanished since 1990 due to the diminishing milkweed habitat that they rely on. Celebrate the Monarch at the North Carolina Arboretum as it hosts Monarch Butterfly Day September 28, 2019 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.. Events include a monarch butterfly tag and release, a milkweed plant sale, children's activities, displays and more.

Header Monarch image courtesy of Hop'n Blueberry Farm.

Updated September 4, 2019
Read More