Garden-to-Table Dining Takes Root

Garden-to-Table Dining Takes Root
Asheville restaurants turn to urban gardens


Chef Peter Pollay checks on the kale growing in his West Asheville

garden plot. Photo courtesy of Posana Restaurant.
The restaurants and markets of Asheville have long relied on Western North Carolina's wealth of farms for local produce, eggs and meat--one of the reasons the area also goes by the name "Foodtopia"--but now several restaurants are bringing their sources a few steps closer to home.

Chef Peter Pollay, owner of downtown's Posana restaurant, is kicking off the spring season by adding herbs and vegetables that he has grown himself to the variety of ingredients sourced from 60+ local farmers.

The first harvest of veggies, grown in about eight raised beds in a West Asheville backyard, includes collards, radishes, beets and kale--for Pollay's famous kale salad, of course.

Another West Asheville plot has long been providing fresh flavors for Sunny Point Cafe, located right next door to the half-acre kitchen garden that began as a patch of herbs. Each summer the garden provides up to 800 pounds of heirloom tomatoes alone--tomatoes that no doubt make their way into the restaurant's famous breakfast burritos and huevos rancheros. Plus, the colorful and diverse plants act as an attractive park for diners to visit as they await their table.

A newcomer in the Asheville culinary scene, Sovereign Remedies takes its roots seriously. Founded on a farm-to-bar concept that also calls on traditional medicinals, the cocktail hotspot also serves up delicious eats from a tiny kitchen.

Owner Charlie Hodge and his partner, Sunil Patel, launched Sovereign Remedies in concert with another effort. Patchwork Urban Farms works to transform small plots of land into growing spaces that, when joined together, can provide enough food to support CSA subscriptions, two farm stands and local restaurants. Patchwork's eggs and produce appear on the menu regularly at Sovereign Remedies, and the group also works with chefs at Table, Storm and The Bull & Beggar.

Explore more Foodtopian stories.

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